Thursday, 29 August 2013

FIMO

Following on from yesterday's blog about tram wire rosettes, I set about making some today from FIMO, the oven hardening modelling clay.



Carved them to shape with a kitchen knife

Made 12.

Placed them in oven for 45 minutes

A FIMO rosette in position.
 See yesterday's blog to make sense of the above.

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Currently listening to:




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Last night's dinner: 

Forgot to take photograph of meal on the plate but rescued the label from the bin later.

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 Currently Reading:



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Miscellany:

The second bongo lesson covered much more ground than the first and I'm beginning to separate out the elements of bongo playing:

sequence or pattern of strokes

matching the timing/rhythm of that sequence to the music one is accompanying

recovering from errors in the sequence whilst keeping that rhythm going (see * below)

strength of the individual strokes - my left hand still lapses into "grazing" the skin rather than striking it.

accent - intentionally striking harder or softer one particular member of the sequence

location on the skin where one strikes - there are a variety of options

striking the skin with different parts of the hand

linking all of the above to some kind of notation

* I once had a neighbour who practised the piano every day and became very accomplished over the years. But, he NEVER played a piece all the way through without stopping at the occurrence of each tiny mistake, repeating the phrase until he got it right, and then proceeding doggedly to the end.

So, a 5 minute piece would last 20 minutes.

He obviously got pleasure from taking that approach. I will not take that approach. I'm familiar with enough classical piano repertoire to have learned long ago that concert pianists constantly make small mistakes. They don't stop, they recover from them and keep going. That will be my approach.

Making mistakes is an inevitable part of the performance - even if the audience is only oneself.

And , no, my neighbour wasn't perfecting things at home so he could enhance his performance elsewhere - he only played at home.


Finally, I've been playing the bongos tilting towards me, so to speak, when they should be tilting away from one - comme ca:



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